Headline NewsPolitics

NDC expresses worry over Akafumba

By GIDEON NYENDWA 

The party is extremely worried about Mr Joseph Akafumba’s presence at the Ministry of Home Affairs because his trickery when in opposition almost collapsed the party, NDC secretary general Charles Kabwita has said.

He has also accused Mr Akafumba of being in active politics despite being a civil servant.

Mr Kabwita said in an interview that there was fear that Mr Akafumba might tamper with their files because the registrar of society reported directly to the Permanent Secretary (PS) in the Ministry of Home Affairs, the office which he now occupies.

He said that if Mr Akafumba attempted a coup on Mr Chishimba Kambwili which led to the splitting of the party into two factions when he was at NDC what could stop him from interfering with the matters of the NDC now that he was at the helm of the ministry of Home Affairs.

“We are extremely worried,” he said.

Mr Kabwita said that Mr Akafumba wanted to impose himself as NDC president but he failed;  and when he was appointed as PS under the UPND government he went further and resurrected Mr Mwenya Musenge and anointed him as president of the party.

Mr Kabwita said that after the revelation by the leaked audio that went round on social media suggesting that Mr Akafumba was trying to interfere with the affairs of the Democratic Party (DP) fear has gripped us because of what he was capable of doing to a party that he had interest in.

He said that if Mr Akafumba was left unchecked in that office he could destroy all opposition political parties in the country.

Mr Kabwita said that it was unfortunate that Mr Akafumba had continued to be active in politics even though he was a civil servant because he still calls for meetings with some members of the NDC.

He said that he wanted to know whether Mr Akafumba had resigned from his position in NDC or he was a civil servant who was also a politician.

Mr Kabwita said that Mr Akafumba was abrogating the constitution with impunity by remaining in active politics.

Back to top button